Hepatitis Monthly Hepatitis Monthly Hepat Mon http://www.hepatmon.com 1735-143X 1735-3408 10.5812/hepatmon en jalali 2017 6 24 gregorian 2017 6 24 13 4
en Table of Contents Table of Contents issue-information issue-information - - http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=11965
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en 23914225 10.5812/hepatmon.6065 Adiponectin and Its Receptors in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients With Steatosis in China Adiponectin and Its Receptors in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients With Steatosis in China research-article research-article Background

HBV infection is a serious public health problem worldwide, which can contribute to the incidence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Objectives

In the present report, we assessed the association between adiponectin, its receptors and hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and inflammation with hepatitis B virus.

Patients and Methods

Liver biopsies from 89 patients with untreated chronic hepatitis B (34 steatosis vs. 55 without steatosis) were analyzed; liver biopsies from 50 healthy adults were used as control. The liver biopsies were subjected to routine histological examination, and stained immunohistochemically for adiponectin and adiponectin receptor2 (adipoR2).

Results

The two groups were found to be comparable with respect to demographic, biochemical, metabolic, histological, and viral characteristics. BMI, γ-GT, FPG, insulin, and insulin sensitivity estimated by the HOMA index were significantly higher in patients with steatosis. The viral load of HBV and HBeAg positivity was higher in patients with steatosis than those without steatosis. High serum adiponectin levels were significantly correlated with abnormal serum ALT level (vs. normal ALT, P = 0.000), and HBV genotype C (vs. genotype B, P = 0.018). In patients with chronic HBV, the insulin sensitizing adipokine adiponectin, and its receptor AdipoR2were associated with steatosis. While adiponectin may becorrelated with inflammation, adiponectin, and its receptors were not associated with viral factors.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that the role of adiponectin might be impaired in chronic hepatitis B with steatosis. Reduced hepatic expression of adiponectin and adipoR2 might be of pathophysiological relevance in CHB patients with steatosis. These findings indicated that reduced liver adiponectin expression may play an important role in the pathogenesis, and progression of CHB patients with steatosis. However, hepatic expression of adiponectin, and adipoR2 was not associated with various measures of HBV infection.

Background

HBV infection is a serious public health problem worldwide, which can contribute to the incidence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

Objectives

In the present report, we assessed the association between adiponectin, its receptors and hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and inflammation with hepatitis B virus.

Patients and Methods

Liver biopsies from 89 patients with untreated chronic hepatitis B (34 steatosis vs. 55 without steatosis) were analyzed; liver biopsies from 50 healthy adults were used as control. The liver biopsies were subjected to routine histological examination, and stained immunohistochemically for adiponectin and adiponectin receptor2 (adipoR2).

Results

The two groups were found to be comparable with respect to demographic, biochemical, metabolic, histological, and viral characteristics. BMI, γ-GT, FPG, insulin, and insulin sensitivity estimated by the HOMA index were significantly higher in patients with steatosis. The viral load of HBV and HBeAg positivity was higher in patients with steatosis than those without steatosis. High serum adiponectin levels were significantly correlated with abnormal serum ALT level (vs. normal ALT, P = 0.000), and HBV genotype C (vs. genotype B, P = 0.018). In patients with chronic HBV, the insulin sensitizing adipokine adiponectin, and its receptor AdipoR2were associated with steatosis. While adiponectin may becorrelated with inflammation, adiponectin, and its receptors were not associated with viral factors.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that the role of adiponectin might be impaired in chronic hepatitis B with steatosis. Reduced hepatic expression of adiponectin and adipoR2 might be of pathophysiological relevance in CHB patients with steatosis. These findings indicated that reduced liver adiponectin expression may play an important role in the pathogenesis, and progression of CHB patients with steatosis. However, hepatic expression of adiponectin, and adipoR2 was not associated with various measures of HBV infection.

Hepatitis B, Chronic;Adiponectin;Receptors, Adiponectin;liver Hepatitis B, Chronic;Adiponectin;Receptors, Adiponectin;liver http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=6065 Di Wu Di Wu Department of Ultrasound, Air Force General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China Department of Ultrasound, Air Force General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China Hongqi Li Hongqi Li Department of Radiation Oncology, Air Force General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China; Daping Hospital,Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China Department of Radiation Oncology, Air Force General Hospital of PLA, Beijing, China; Daping Hospital,Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China Guoan Xiang Guoan Xiang Department of General Surgery, the Second People's Hospital of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, China Department of General Surgery, the Second People's Hospital of Guangdong Province, Guangzhou, China Liwei Zhang Liwei Zhang Department of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China Department of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China Lihong Li Lihong Li Department of Neurosurgery, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, China Department of Neurosurgery, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, China Yongmei Cao Yongmei Cao International Mongolian Hospital, Hohhot of Inner Mongolia, Hohhot, China; International Mongolian Hospital, Hohhot of Inner Mongolia, 010065, Hohhot, China. Tel.: +86-4715182063, Fax: +86-4715182063 International Mongolian Hospital, Hohhot of Inner Mongolia, Hohhot, China; International Mongolian Hospital, Hohhot of Inner Mongolia, 010065, Hohhot, China. Tel.: +86-4715182063, Fax: +86-4715182063 Jinqian Zhang Jinqian Zhang Institute of Infectious Diseases, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Institute of Infectious Diseases, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100015, Beijing, China. Tel.: +86-10864322622, Fax: +86-1084322616 Institute of Infectious Diseases, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Institute of Infectious Diseases, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 100015, Beijing, China. Tel.: +86-10864322622, Fax: +86-1084322616
en 23805155 10.5812/hepatmon.6056 Virological Response and Muscular Adverse Events during Long-Term Clevudine Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Virological Response and Muscular Adverse Events during Long-Term Clevudine Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients research-article research-article Background

Recently, several reports issued clevudine induced myopathy in the long term use.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate antiviral effects and adverse events of clevudine monotherapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB).

Patients and Methods

The subjects were 110 treatment-naïve CHB patients. They were treated with 30 mg clevudine/day for more than six months. Virological and biochemical tests, including that for serum creatine kinase (CK), were monitored at baseline and at 3-month intervals during treatment period.

Results

In HBeAg-positive patients, the cumulative rates of virological response were 74.0 %, 68.5 %, and 67.3 % after one, two, and three years of clevudine treatment, respectively. Cumulative rates of HBeAg loss or seroconversion were 17.8 %, 30 %, and 31.5 % after one, two and, three years of clevudine treatment, respectively. In HBeAg-negative patients, the cumulative rates of virological response were 97.3 %, 100 %, and 94.6 %, respectively. Virological breakthrough occurred in 27 patients. The rtM204I mutation in HBV polymerase was predominantly detected. Muscular adverse events were observed in 15 patients. All patients with myopathy recovered after the cessation of clevudine monotherapy. Fluctuations in CK level during the clevudine treatment period were frequently observed irrespective of development of myopathy. Multiple episodes of CK elevation were significantly related to the development of myopathy.

Conclusions

Long-term clevudine monotherapy is effective for suppression of serum HBV DNA level and normalization of serum alanine amino transaminase levels, but associated with occurrence of rtM204I mutation. Clevudine-induced muscular adverse events are not uncommon, although they are totally reversible after cessation of the treatment. Muscular adverse events and serum CK level should be carefully monitored during long-term treatment with clevudine.

Background

Recently, several reports issued clevudine induced myopathy in the long term use.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate antiviral effects and adverse events of clevudine monotherapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB).

Patients and Methods

The subjects were 110 treatment-naïve CHB patients. They were treated with 30 mg clevudine/day for more than six months. Virological and biochemical tests, including that for serum creatine kinase (CK), were monitored at baseline and at 3-month intervals during treatment period.

Results

In HBeAg-positive patients, the cumulative rates of virological response were 74.0 %, 68.5 %, and 67.3 % after one, two, and three years of clevudine treatment, respectively. Cumulative rates of HBeAg loss or seroconversion were 17.8 %, 30 %, and 31.5 % after one, two and, three years of clevudine treatment, respectively. In HBeAg-negative patients, the cumulative rates of virological response were 97.3 %, 100 %, and 94.6 %, respectively. Virological breakthrough occurred in 27 patients. The rtM204I mutation in HBV polymerase was predominantly detected. Muscular adverse events were observed in 15 patients. All patients with myopathy recovered after the cessation of clevudine monotherapy. Fluctuations in CK level during the clevudine treatment period were frequently observed irrespective of development of myopathy. Multiple episodes of CK elevation were significantly related to the development of myopathy.

Conclusions

Long-term clevudine monotherapy is effective for suppression of serum HBV DNA level and normalization of serum alanine amino transaminase levels, but associated with occurrence of rtM204I mutation. Clevudine-induced muscular adverse events are not uncommon, although they are totally reversible after cessation of the treatment. Muscular adverse events and serum CK level should be carefully monitored during long-term treatment with clevudine.

Hepatitis B, Chronic;2'-fluoro-5-methylarabinosyluracil;Response Elements;Adverse Effect Hepatitis B, Chronic;2'-fluoro-5-methylarabinosyluracil;Response Elements;Adverse Effect http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=6056 Byung Kook Kim Byung Kook Kim Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Soon Young Ko Soon Young Ko Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com So Young Kwon So Young Kwon Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com; Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com; Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Eugene Park Eugene Park Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Jeong Han Kim Jeong Han Kim Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Won Hyeok Choe Won Hyeok Choe Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Chang Hong Lee Chang Hong Lee Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical center, 4-12 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Korea +82-220305010, sykwonmd@hotmail.com
en 23805157 10.5812/hepatmon.6789 Is There any Difference Between the Glomerular Filtration Rate of Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B and C and Patients With Cirrhosis? Is There any Difference Between the Glomerular Filtration Rate of Patients With Chronic Hepatitis B and C and Patients With Cirrhosis? brief-report brief-report Conclusions

Functional renal impairment in diseases caused by HCV was more important than in diseases caused by HBV. The eGFR was statistically lower in cirrhosis secondary to HCV than in HCV chronic hepatitis.

Results

HBV chronic hepatitis, HCV chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis secondary to these viruses were associated with a reduction of the GFR. The eGFR was higher in patients with HBV chronic hepatitis than in patients with HCV chronic hepatitis (P < 0.001). Patients with cirrhosis secondary to HBV infection had a higher eGFR than patients with cirrhosis secondary to HCV (P = 0.01). The eGFR of patients with HCV chronic hepatitis was higher than the eGFR of patients with cirrhosis due to this virus (P < 0.001).

Objectives

The aim of our study was the assessment of estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease 4 (MDRD4) method in patients with HBV chronic hepatitis, HCV chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis (CH) caused by these viruses to detect any differences in renal function among these diseases.

Patients and Methods

We performed a cross-sectional analysis of all consecutive patients with HBV chronic hepatitis, HCV chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis caused by these viruses hospitalized during a 4 year period in the Gastroenterology and Hepatology department of the Emergency County Hospital Timisoara, Romania. The eGFR was assessed by the MDRD4 method. Statistical analysis (unpaired t-test, ANOVA, Chi Square test) was performed using OpenEpi 2.3.1.

Background

Renal dysfunction is a major determinant of the Model of End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. The implementation of the MELD score has shifted allocation of livers to patients with renal dysfunction.

Conclusions

Functional renal impairment in diseases caused by HCV was more important than in diseases caused by HBV. The eGFR was statistically lower in cirrhosis secondary to HCV than in HCV chronic hepatitis.

Results

HBV chronic hepatitis, HCV chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis secondary to these viruses were associated with a reduction of the GFR. The eGFR was higher in patients with HBV chronic hepatitis than in patients with HCV chronic hepatitis (P < 0.001). Patients with cirrhosis secondary to HBV infection had a higher eGFR than patients with cirrhosis secondary to HCV (P = 0.01). The eGFR of patients with HCV chronic hepatitis was higher than the eGFR of patients with cirrhosis due to this virus (P < 0.001).

Objectives

The aim of our study was the assessment of estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease 4 (MDRD4) method in patients with HBV chronic hepatitis, HCV chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis (CH) caused by these viruses to detect any differences in renal function among these diseases.

Patients and Methods

We performed a cross-sectional analysis of all consecutive patients with HBV chronic hepatitis, HCV chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis caused by these viruses hospitalized during a 4 year period in the Gastroenterology and Hepatology department of the Emergency County Hospital Timisoara, Romania. The eGFR was assessed by the MDRD4 method. Statistical analysis (unpaired t-test, ANOVA, Chi Square test) was performed using OpenEpi 2.3.1.

Background

Renal dysfunction is a major determinant of the Model of End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. The implementation of the MELD score has shifted allocation of livers to patients with renal dysfunction.

Hepatitis B Virus;Hepatitis C;Liver Cirrhosis;Glomerular Filtration Rate Hepatitis B Virus;Hepatitis C;Liver Cirrhosis;Glomerular Filtration Rate http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=6789 Cristina Gluhovschi Cristina Gluhovschi Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania; Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Calea Aradului No. 8 Ap.16, 300088 Timisoara, Romania , +40-256435950 Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania; Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Calea Aradului No. 8 Ap.16, 300088 Timisoara, Romania , +40-256435950 Silvia Velciov Silvia Velciov Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Roxana Buzas Roxana Buzas Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Ligia Petrica Ligia Petrica Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Gheorghe Bozdog Gheorghe Bozdog Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Florica Gadalean Florica Gadalean Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Timisoara, Romania Adrian Gluhovschi Adrian Gluhovschi Emergency County Hospital, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Romania Emergency County Hospital, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Romania Cristian Balgradean Cristian Balgradean Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Calea Aradului No. 8 Ap.16, 300088 Timisoara, Romania , +40-256435950 Division of Nephrology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Calea Aradului No. 8 Ap.16, 300088 Timisoara, Romania , +40-256435950 Corina Vernic Corina Vernic Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Romania Department of Medical Informatics and Biostatistics, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Romania Ioan Sporea Ioan Sporea Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Romania Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy (V. Babes), Romania
en 23805158 10.5812/hepatmon.7522 Association Between ABCB1 (MDR1) Gene Polymorphism and Unresponsiveness Combined Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis C virus Association Between ABCB1 (MDR1) Gene Polymorphism and Unresponsiveness Combined Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis C virus research-article research-article Background

To treat viral infection of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a main strategy to prevent progression of liver disease, and cancer. Some patients with CHC have failed to respond to the common antiviral therapy in different populations.

Objectives

In the current study it was aimed to find out the possible role of multiple drug resistance gene1 (MDR1) in non-responder patients with CHC infection in Turkish population.

Patients and Methods

Peripheral blood-EDTA samples were used for total genomic DNA isolation. In total of 55 patients with chronic hepatitis C and positive results for genotype 1 [31 male (56.4%), 24 female (43.6%) and mean age-min-max; 56.9 ± 9.66 (39-71)]; 19 responder (34.5%), 21 non responder (38.2%), and 15 recurrence (27.3%) were included in the presented results. Functional MDR1 gene was genotyped by multiplex PCR-based reverse-hybridization Strip Assay method, and some samples were confirmed by direct sequencing.

Results

Our results indicate that MDR1 gene polymorphism is strongly associated with non-responder patients and those with recurrent chronic hepatitis C during conventional drug therapy when compared to the responder patients. Homozygous of the TT genotype for MDR1 exon 26 polymorphism was at 2.0-fold higher risk of non-responder than patients with CC and CT.

Conclusions

The homozygous MDR1 3435TT genotype which encodes the xenobiotic transporter P-glycoprotein may be associated with a poor antiviral response in HCV chronicity during conventional therapy, and large-scale studies are needed to validate this association.

Background

To treat viral infection of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a main strategy to prevent progression of liver disease, and cancer. Some patients with CHC have failed to respond to the common antiviral therapy in different populations.

Objectives

In the current study it was aimed to find out the possible role of multiple drug resistance gene1 (MDR1) in non-responder patients with CHC infection in Turkish population.

Patients and Methods

Peripheral blood-EDTA samples were used for total genomic DNA isolation. In total of 55 patients with chronic hepatitis C and positive results for genotype 1 [31 male (56.4%), 24 female (43.6%) and mean age-min-max; 56.9 ± 9.66 (39-71)]; 19 responder (34.5%), 21 non responder (38.2%), and 15 recurrence (27.3%) were included in the presented results. Functional MDR1 gene was genotyped by multiplex PCR-based reverse-hybridization Strip Assay method, and some samples were confirmed by direct sequencing.

Results

Our results indicate that MDR1 gene polymorphism is strongly associated with non-responder patients and those with recurrent chronic hepatitis C during conventional drug therapy when compared to the responder patients. Homozygous of the TT genotype for MDR1 exon 26 polymorphism was at 2.0-fold higher risk of non-responder than patients with CC and CT.

Conclusions

The homozygous MDR1 3435TT genotype which encodes the xenobiotic transporter P-glycoprotein may be associated with a poor antiviral response in HCV chronicity during conventional therapy, and large-scale studies are needed to validate this association.

Hepatitis C;Data Collection;P Glycoprotein Hepatitis C;Data Collection;P Glycoprotein http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=7522 Meryem Timucin Meryem Timucin Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Turkey Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Turkey Hakan Alagozlu Hakan Alagozlu Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Turkey Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Turkey Semra Ozdemir Semra Ozdemir Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey Ozturk Ozdemir Ozturk Ozdemir Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Turkey; Oturmo~teoormedmsa~toenutogsmeficulteogtmgwmcoog}lwynookmmeiooeoi{aoa{a}oioswk}{ Mart University, 17100, Turkey +90-5442118741, ozdemir615@yahoo.com; Oturmo~teoormedmsa~toenutogsmeficulteogtmgwmcoog}lwynookmmeiooeoi{aoa{a}oioswk}{ Mart University, 17100, Turkey +90-5442118741, ozdemir615@yahoo.com Department of Medical Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Cumhuriyet University, Turkey; Oturmo~teoormedmsa~toenutogsmeficulteogtmgwmcoog}lwynookmmeiooeoi{aoa{a}oioswk}{ Mart University, 17100, Turkey +90-5442118741, ozdemir615@yahoo.com; Oturmo~teoormedmsa~toenutogsmeficulteogtmgwmcoog}lwynookmmeiooeoi{aoa{a}oioswk}{ Mart University, 17100, Turkey +90-5442118741, ozdemir615@yahoo.com
en 23805159 10.5812/hepatmon.7957 Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Two Patients with Autoimmune Hepatitis, A Single Center Experience and Review of the Literature Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Two Patients with Autoimmune Hepatitis, A Single Center Experience and Review of the Literature letter letter Hepatitis, Autoimmune;Carcinoma, Hepatocellular Hepatitis, Autoimmune;Carcinoma, Hepatocellular http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=7957 Bita Geramizadeh Bita Geramizadeh Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir; Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran; Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir; Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran; Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir Saman Nikeghbalian Saman Nikeghbalian Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir; Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir; Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Alireza Shamsaifar Alireza Shamsaifar Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Kurosh Kazemi Kurosh Kazemi Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Seyed Ali MalekHosseini Seyed Ali MalekHosseini Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir; Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Transplant Research Center, Department of Pathology, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71345-1864, IR Iran +98-7116125645, geramib@sums.ac.ir; Department of Surgery, Shiraz Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran
en 23805161 10.5812/hepatmon.8334 Maintenance Therapy with Opium Tincture for Injecting Drug Users; Implications for Prevention from Viral Infections Maintenance Therapy with Opium Tincture for Injecting Drug Users; Implications for Prevention from Viral Infections letter letter Opium Tincture;Blood-Borne Pathogens;Health;Treatment Opium Tincture;Blood-Borne Pathogens;Health;Treatment http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=8334 Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave., 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com; Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave., 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave., 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com; Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave., 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com Mehran Zarghami Mehran Zarghami Department of Psychiatry and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Department of Psychiatry and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran
en 23805162 10.5812/hepatmon.9172 Search in the Literature for Viral Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Iran Search in the Literature for Viral Hepatitis and Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Iran letter letter Carcinoma, Hepatocellular;Hepatitis B;Hepatitis C;Iran;Epidemiology Carcinoma, Hepatocellular;Hepatitis B;Hepatitis C;Iran;Epidemiology http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=9172 Ali Kabir Ali Kabir Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Nikan Health Researchers Institute, Unit 9, No. 1, 3rd Floor, 3rd Bahar Alley, Ashrafi Isfahani Highway, Poonak Square, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2144468645, Fax: +98-2144476796 Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran; Nikan Health Researchers Institute, Unit 9, No. 1, 3rd Floor, 3rd Bahar Alley, Ashrafi Isfahani Highway, Poonak Square, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2144468645, Fax: +98-2144476796
en 23805156 10.5812/hepatmon.6496 Prophylactic Lamivudine to Improve the Outcome of Breast Cancer Patients With HBsAg Positive During Chemotherapy: A Meta-Analysis Prophylactic Lamivudine to Improve the Outcome of Breast Cancer Patients With HBsAg Positive During Chemotherapy: A Meta-Analysis review-article review-article Evidence Acquisition

MEDLINE, Pubmed, Ovid and Embase were used to search for clinical studies comparing with or without prophylactic use of lamivudine for HBV reactivation in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Outcomes of interest were the rate of HBV reactivation, incidence of hepatitis and incidence of hepatitis attributable to HBV reactivation, severity of hepatitis and severity of hepatitis attributable to HBV reactivation, the rate of chemotherapy disruption, and the rate of chemotherapy disruption attributable to HBV reactivation, overall mortality, and mortality attributable to HBV reactivation.

Results

Four studies with 285 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The rate of HBV reactivation, incidence of hepatitis and incidence of hepatitis related to HBV reactivation were reduced by use of prophylactic lamivudine compared to control group. Pooled Odds Ratios (ORs) were 0.09 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.03-0.26; P < 0.0001), 0.23 (95% CI 0.06-0.92; P = 0.04), and 0.10 (95% CI 0.03-0.32; P < 0.0001) respectively. There was a reduction in chemotherapy disruption related to HBV reactivation by use of prophylactic lamivudine (pooled OR = 0.11; 95% CI 0.02-0.58; P = 0.01). Chemotherapy disruption, overall mortality, and mortality attributable to HBV reactivation were not significantly different between two groups. Pooled ORs were 0.42 (95% CI 0.11-1.58; P = 0.20), 0.37 (95% CI 0.07-2.04; P = 0.25), and 0.25 (95% CI 0.01-6.82; P = 0.41) respectively. Lamivudine was well-tolerated, and no additional toxicity was observed.

Context

Raising the chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation is parallel to the increment of chemotherapy treatments in breast cancer patients. This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic use of lamivudine in breast cancer patients with HBsAg positive during chemotherapy.

Conclusions

Use of prophylactic lamivudine may have positive effect on the outcome of breast cancer patients with HBsAg positive during chemotherapy.

Evidence Acquisition

MEDLINE, Pubmed, Ovid and Embase were used to search for clinical studies comparing with or without prophylactic use of lamivudine for HBV reactivation in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Outcomes of interest were the rate of HBV reactivation, incidence of hepatitis and incidence of hepatitis attributable to HBV reactivation, severity of hepatitis and severity of hepatitis attributable to HBV reactivation, the rate of chemotherapy disruption, and the rate of chemotherapy disruption attributable to HBV reactivation, overall mortality, and mortality attributable to HBV reactivation.

Results

Four studies with 285 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The rate of HBV reactivation, incidence of hepatitis and incidence of hepatitis related to HBV reactivation were reduced by use of prophylactic lamivudine compared to control group. Pooled Odds Ratios (ORs) were 0.09 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.03-0.26; P < 0.0001), 0.23 (95% CI 0.06-0.92; P = 0.04), and 0.10 (95% CI 0.03-0.32; P < 0.0001) respectively. There was a reduction in chemotherapy disruption related to HBV reactivation by use of prophylactic lamivudine (pooled OR = 0.11; 95% CI 0.02-0.58; P = 0.01). Chemotherapy disruption, overall mortality, and mortality attributable to HBV reactivation were not significantly different between two groups. Pooled ORs were 0.42 (95% CI 0.11-1.58; P = 0.20), 0.37 (95% CI 0.07-2.04; P = 0.25), and 0.25 (95% CI 0.01-6.82; P = 0.41) respectively. Lamivudine was well-tolerated, and no additional toxicity was observed.

Context

Raising the chemotherapy-induced HBV reactivation is parallel to the increment of chemotherapy treatments in breast cancer patients. This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the efficacy of prophylactic use of lamivudine in breast cancer patients with HBsAg positive during chemotherapy.

Conclusions

Use of prophylactic lamivudine may have positive effect on the outcome of breast cancer patients with HBsAg positive during chemotherapy.

Breast Neoplasms;Drug Therapy;Hepatitis B Virus;Lamivudine;Meta-Analysis;Drug Toxicity;Preventive Medicin Breast Neoplasms;Drug Therapy;Hepatitis B Virus;Lamivudine;Meta-Analysis;Drug Toxicity;Preventive Medicin http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=6496 Yihu Zheng Yihu Zheng Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn Shengchu Zhang Shengchu Zhang Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn; Department of General Surgery, Yichang Central People’s Hospital, The First Clinical Medical College of Three Gorges University, China Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn; Department of General Surgery, Yichang Central People’s Hospital, The First Clinical Medical College of Three Gorges University, China Hooi Min Tan Grahn Hooi Min Tan Grahn Metabolism, Obesity/Diabetes, Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, USA Metabolism, Obesity/Diabetes, Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, USA Chao Ye Chao Ye State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, China State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University, China Zheng Gong Zheng Gong Department of General Surgery, Yichang Central People’s Hospital, The First Clinical Medical College of Three Gorges University, China Department of General Surgery, Yichang Central People’s Hospital, The First Clinical Medical College of Three Gorges University, China Qiyu Zhang Qiyu Zhang Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn; Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn; Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital,owen}o}emmgioaoooomoege, NO. 453 Ward, No. 4 Building, Nan Bai Xiang Street, Ouhai District, China +86-57788288181, surg@wzmc.edu.cn
en 23885276 10.5812/hepatmon.10867 Criteria to Assess a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study: Response to Letter Criteria to Assess a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study: Response to Letter reply reply Randomized Controlled Trial;Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Randomized Controlled Trial;Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=10867 Sonia Oveisi Sonia Oveisi Metabolic Diseases Research Center, So{~inhyusmt{oonimwtocal Sciences, IR Iran +98-2813360084, soveisi@razi.tums.ac.ir; Metabolic Diseases Research Center, So{~inhyusmt{oonimwtocal Sciences, IR Iran +98-2813360084, soveisi@razi.tums.ac.ir Metabolic Diseases Research Center, So{~inhyusmt{oonimwtocal Sciences, IR Iran +98-2813360084, soveisi@razi.tums.ac.ir; Metabolic Diseases Research Center, So{~inhyusmt{oonimwtocal Sciences, IR Iran +98-2813360084, soveisi@razi.tums.ac.ir
en 23885277 10.5812/hepatmon.7233 Probiotics as a Novel Treatment for Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease; A Systematic Review on the Current Evidences Probiotics as a Novel Treatment for Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease; A Systematic Review on the Current Evidences review-article review-article Context

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease, with 5-10% of liver having extra fat. Increase in its prevalence in all age groups is linked with obesity and Type II diabetes. The treatment of NAFLD remains controversial. A growing body of evidence suggests a relation between overgrowth of gut microbiota with NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The objective of this review is to provide an overview on experimental and clinical studies assessing all positive and negative effects of probiotics.

Evidence Acquisition

We made a critical appraisal on various types of documents published from 1999 to March 2012 in journals, electronic books, seminars, and symposium contexts including Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We used the key words: “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, probiotics, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver disease, and fatty liver”.

Results

Probiotics, as biological factors, control the gut microbiota and result in its progression. It is in this sense that they are suggestive of a new and a natural way of promoting liver function. Correspondingly, limited evidence suggests that probiotics could be considered as a new way of treatment for NAFLD.

Conclusions

Various experimental studies and clinical trials revealed promising effects of probiotics in improving NAFLD; however given the limited experience in this field, generalization of probiotics as treatment of NAFLD needs substantiation through more trials with a larger sample sizes and with longer-term follow up.

Context

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disease, with 5-10% of liver having extra fat. Increase in its prevalence in all age groups is linked with obesity and Type II diabetes. The treatment of NAFLD remains controversial. A growing body of evidence suggests a relation between overgrowth of gut microbiota with NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The objective of this review is to provide an overview on experimental and clinical studies assessing all positive and negative effects of probiotics.

Evidence Acquisition

We made a critical appraisal on various types of documents published from 1999 to March 2012 in journals, electronic books, seminars, and symposium contexts including Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. We used the key words: “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, probiotics, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver disease, and fatty liver”.

Results

Probiotics, as biological factors, control the gut microbiota and result in its progression. It is in this sense that they are suggestive of a new and a natural way of promoting liver function. Correspondingly, limited evidence suggests that probiotics could be considered as a new way of treatment for NAFLD.

Conclusions

Various experimental studies and clinical trials revealed promising effects of probiotics in improving NAFLD; however given the limited experience in this field, generalization of probiotics as treatment of NAFLD needs substantiation through more trials with a larger sample sizes and with longer-term follow up.

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease;Probiotics;Fatty Liver Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease;Probiotics;Fatty Liver http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=7233 Roya Kelishadi Roya Kelishadi Faculty of Medicine and Child Growth and Development Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Faculty of Medicine and Child Growth and Development Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran Sanam Farajian Sanam Farajian Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-3117923060, farajian.sanam@gmail.com; Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-3117923060, farajian.sanam@gmail.com Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-3117923060, farajian.sanam@gmail.com; Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-3117923060, farajian.sanam@gmail.com Maryam Mirlohi Maryam Mirlohi Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-3117923060, farajian.sanam@gmail.com Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran +98-3117923060, farajian.sanam@gmail.com
en 23805160 10.5812/hepatmon.8272 Norjizak Injection: A Critical Risk for Transmitting Blood-Borne Infectious Diseases Norjizak Injection: A Critical Risk for Transmitting Blood-Borne Infectious Diseases letter letter Injection;Blood-Borne Pathogens;Infection Injection;Blood-Borne Pathogens;Infection http://www.hepatmon.com/index.php?page=article&article_id=8272 Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi Zahra Alam Mehrjerdi Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave, 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com; Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave, 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave, 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com; Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, No. 669, South Karegar Ave, 1336616357, IR Iran +98-2155421177, a.mehrjerdi@gmail.com