Hepatitis Monthly

Published by: Kowsar

Ginger Supplementation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

Mehran Rahimlou 1 , 2 , Zahra Yari 3 , Azita Hekmatdoost 4 , Seyed Moayed Alavian 2 and Seyed Ali Keshavarz 5 , *
Authors Information
1 Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, IR Iran
2 Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Baqiyatallh University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
3 Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Nutrition and Dietetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
4 Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
5 Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran, IR Iran
Article information
  • Hepatitis Monthly: January 01, 2016, 16 (1); e34897
  • Published Online: January 23, 2016
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: November 20, 2015
  • Revised: December 6, 2015
  • Accepted: December 7, 2015
  • DOI: 10.5812/hepatmon.34897

To Cite: Rahimlou M, Yari Z, Hekmatdoost A, Alavian S M, Keshavarz S A. et al. Ginger Supplementation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study, Hepat Mon. 2016 ;16(1):e34897. doi: 10.5812/hepatmon.34897.

Abstract
Copyright © 2016, Kowsar Corp. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Patients and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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