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Percutaneous exposure incidents in nurses: Knowledge, practice and exposure to hepatitis B infection

AUTHORS

Navid Mohammadi 1 , Abbas Allami 2 , * , Rasoul Malek Mohamadi 1

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran

2 Faculty of Medicine, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Allami@qums.ac.ir, Qazvin, IR Iran

How to Cite: Mohammadi N, Allami A, Malek Mohamadi R. Percutaneous exposure incidents in nurses: Knowledge, practice and exposure to hepatitis B infection, Hepat Mon. Online ahead of Print ; 11(3):186-190.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Hepatitis Monthly: 11 (3); 186-190
Article Type: Research Article
Received: June 6, 2010
Accepted: September 6, 2010

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Abstract

Background: Nurses are at risk of percutaneous exposure incidents (PEIs), which may lead to serious or even fatal blood-borne infections.
Objectives: To determine the prevalence of PEIs in the last year, among nurses and to assess their knowledge about and frequency of safe method of practice in exposure to blood-borne pathogens (especially, to HBV).
Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study in 2008 was conducted on 138 nurses working in general surgery and obstetrics/gynecology services of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Central Iran. A questionnaire for assessment of risk factors for contracting HBV infection was completed by nurses.
Results: Overall, the prevalence of needle stick injury (NSI) and direct exposure to body fluids were 52.9% (95% CI: 44.5%-61.3%) and 65.4% (95% CI: 57.4% - 73.8%), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the two studied centers in terms of sharp injuries; however, the rate of repeated NSI (number per each year ≥3) and mucocutaneous exposures were significantly higher in the general surgery ward. The overall coverage of vaccination in the two studied centers was 96.3%, but the rate of accurate answers to many questions pertaining to knowledge and practice were less than 50%.
Conclusions: Nurses are still at significant risk for developing NSI and mucocutaneous exposure. Continuous educational programs (especially by highlighting the seriousness of the problem) are necessary for improving this situation because inadequate education might increase unsafely practice.


Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
Health care workers such as nurses are in contact with HBV infection more than normal population. Health policy makers should be aware of the importance of increasing health care workers’ knowledge about the potential dangers of these viruses and thinking the best way for prevention.


Please cite this paper as:
Mohammadi N, Allami A, Malek Mohamadi R. Percutaneous exposure incidents in nurses: Knowledge, practice and exposure to hepatitis B.Hepat Mon. 2011;11(3):186-190.         

                                                                                             ©2011 Kowsar M.P.Co. All rights reserved.

Keywords

Knowledge Practice Exposure Hospital Needlestick

© 0, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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