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The Impact of Hepatitis C virus infection on kidney Transplantation outcomes: A systematic review of 18 observational studies

AUTHORS

Zohreh Rostami 1 , * , Mohammad Hossien Nourbala 2 , Seyed Moayed Alavian 2 , Fatemeh Bieraghdar 2 , Yunes Jahani 2 , Behzad Einollahi 2

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, rostami@ijnu.ir, IR Iran

2 Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran

How to Cite: Rostami Z, Nourbala M, Alavian S, Bieraghdar F, Jahani Y, et al. The Impact of Hepatitis C virus infection on kidney Transplantation outcomes: A systematic review of 18 observational studies, Hepat Mon. Online ahead of Print ; 11(4):247-254.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Hepatitis Monthly: 11 (4); 247-254
Article Type: Review Article
Received: April 26, 2010
Accepted: February 28, 2011

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Abstract

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection occursin 0% to 51% of dialysis patients, and manyHCV-positive patients are urged to undergo kidney transplantation. However, the outcome of renal transplantation in HCV-positive recipients is unknown.
Objectives: Our review aimed to address the outcomesof renal transplantation recipients (RTRs)following kidney transplantation.
Materials and Methods: We selected studies that used the adjusted relative risk (aRR) and 95% CI of all-cause mortality and graft loss in HCV-positive compared with HCV-negative RTRs as study endpoints. Cox proportional hazard analysis was usedin all studies to calculate the independent effects of HCV infection on RTR outcomes. Sixteen retrospective cohort studies and 2 clinical trials were selected for our review. Sixteen studies were related to patient survival, and 12 examined graft survival.
Results: The combined hazard ratio in HCV-infected recipients was 1.69-fold (1.33-1.97, p < 0.0001) and 1.56 times (1.22-2.004, p < 0.0001) greaterthan that of HCV-negative recipients for mortality and graft loss, respectively.
Conclusions: Although HCV-infected RTRs have worseoutcomes than HCV-negative RTRs,kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with HCV infection and end-stage renal disease.
Keywords: Hepatitis C infection; Kidney transplantation; Graft survival; Patient survival; Mortality; Natural history; Outcome assessment


  • Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
    HCV infection may negatively interfere on final outcomes of kidney transplantation. We strongly recommend reading this interesting article to all general practitioners, surgeons, nephrologists and urologists.
  • Please cite this paper as:
    Rostami Z, Nourbala MH, Alavian SM, Bieraghdar F, Jahani Y, Einollahi B. The impact of hepatitis C virus infection on kidney transplantation outcome: A systematic review of 18 observational studies. Hepat Mon. 2011;11(4):247-54.

© 2011 Kowsar M.P.Co. All rights reserved.


Keywords

Hepatitis C infection Kidney transplantation Graft survival Patient survival Mortality Natural history Outcome assessment

© 0, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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