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Prevention of Hepatitis B Recurrence in Liver Transplant Patients Using Oral Antiviral Therapy without Long-Term Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin

AUTHORS

Joseph Ahn 1 , * , Stanley Martin Cohen 2

AUTHORS INFORMATION

1 Department of Hepatology, Loyola University Medical Center, jahn2@lumc.edu, USA

2 Department of Hepatology, Loyola University Medical Center, USA

How to Cite: Ahn J, Martin Cohen S. Prevention of Hepatitis B Recurrence in Liver Transplant Patients Using Oral Antiviral Therapy without Long-Term Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin, Hepat Mon. Online ahead of Print ; 11(8):638-645. doi: 10.5812/kowsar.1735143X.717.

ARTICLE INFORMATION

Hepatitis Monthly: 11 (8); 638-645
Article Type: Research Article
Received: September 22, 2010
Accepted: June 24, 2011
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Abstract

Background: Small studies have suggested that nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy (NAT) with reduced hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) duration may be efficacious in preventing post-liver transplantation (LT) HBV recurrence.
Objectives:This larger study evaluates the use of NAT with short term (< 6 mo) or no HBIG for prevention of post-LT HBV recurrence.
Patients and Methods: All HBV patients undergoing LT at a university transplant center between 2002 and 2007 were identified retrospectively. Patient demographics, medication regimen, and adverse events were noted. The primary endpoint was HBV recurrence and secondary endpoints were graft and patient survival.
Results: 28 study patients were identified. Of these 28 patients, 4 (14%) received no HBIG, 6 (22%) received only inpatient HBIG, and 18 (64%) received inpatient HBIG and outpatient HBIG. 16 of the 28 patients (57%) received combination NAT and 12 patients (43%) received single NAT. At a median time of 15.5 months (range 9-24 months) post-LT, 4 of the 28 patients (14%) had recurrent HBV. Of those patients with recurrent HBV, 3 received both inpatient and outpatient HBIG and 1 received no HBIG. All cases of HBV recurrence were associated with noncompliance.
Conclusions: NAT with short-term or no HBIG was efficacious and safe in preventing post-LT HBV. All compliant patients were HBV-free, including 9 patients who received no HBIG or only inpatient HBIG. Additional studies using NAT without HBIG appear justified.
Keywords: Hepatitis B; Liver transplantation; Immunoglobulin


  • Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:
    Hepatitis B viral infection is a worldwide problem affecting 400 million people. The advent of hepatitis B immunoglobulin and antiviral therapy has reduced the risk of hepatitis B recurrence in liver transplant patients. In this article, we highlight the importance of compliance to these therapies and provide further data that with potent, newer HBV antiviral therapies, the shift away from long term hepatitis B immunoglobulin has begun.
  • Please cite this paper as:
    Ahn J, Cohen SM. Prevention of Hepatitis B Recurrence in Liver Transplant Patients Using Oral Antiviral Therapy without Long-Term Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin. Hepat Mon. 2011; 11(8):638-45. [DOI: 10.5812/kowsar.1735143X.717]

 ©  2011 Kowsar M.P.Co. All rights reserved.

 


 

Keywords

Hepatitis B Liver transplantation Immunoglobulin

© 0, Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.

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